Why enjoyment of one’s motorcycle shouldn’t be measured in cubic centimetres...

How is enjoyment measured on a motorcycle? Is it the ability to take sweeping corners on a quiet country road? Is it the ease with which you slip in and out of crowded city traffic? Or is it that quick blast to the local for a pint and a chat? Whatever you answer, it’s unlikely the size of your motorcycle is a major factor.

 

We’re geared to think that bigger is better—bigger houses, bigger cars, bigger pay checks; you know the drill—bigger = faster = better. This is especially true when it comes to motorcycles. The size of your bike, how many cylinders it has, its performance figures, it quickly becomes a pissing contest with no clear winner. Oh so your bike has 208bhp? Congratulations! 2600cc? Wow! On and on and on in a futile game of one-upmanship (one-uppersonship?). 

 

The truth is, the size of your bike may be getting in the way of your ability to enjoy your machine. Sure big bikes are fun, but on the road that can be the wrong tool for the job, like killing a mosquito with a sledgehammer. A quick twist of the throttle and you’re already speeding in first. But, I hear you say, how much fun is it to blast off the line at a set of lights? That is until you get to the next set and realise the rest of the traffic isn’t far behind.

 

At the end of the day, what really matters for most of us is simply the freedom of being on two-wheels. That and being able to give your bike a fistful and feel like Márquez without raising the ire of the local constabulary. Small capacity bikes are light, easy to tug around the garage, make excellent commuters and put a smile on the dial with minimal fuss. Mutt’s range of 250cc motorcycles are the perfect example of how smaller capacity bikes are just as fun as their bigger siblings. Providing a premium entry-level option, Mutt’s bikes are incredibly approachable. Not only do they look great, but they handle exceptionally well and provide you with enough power to have some fun without getting into (too much) trouble. With all the heart and soul of a British classic, but guaranteed to start first time, they are a great option for new and old riders alike.

 

They also make excellent learner bikes, providing an approachable platform to ply your craft without wanting to rip your arms off in the process. Because they’re down on power, they teach you to become a better rider. Unable to power in and out of corners, you’re forced to use engine braking, focus on corner entry and exit, and realise the importance of gear selection. 

 

I once heard a quote from an older motorcyclist who said, ‘I’ve outgrown big motorcycles’. This wisdom in this voice has stuck with me ever since, however regardless of what you choose, every motorcycle is a hell of a lot of fun. Just try not to get wrapped up in the ‘mine is bigger than yours’ argument. Because fun isn’t measured in cubic centimetres. 

This guest post was written by Grant Macdonald of Moto Lane. Photos by Cafe Racer Club with Blackbird Motorcycle Wear